There Will Be An Unrated Version Of Brad Pitt’s Zombie Thriller ‘World War Z’


 

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Paramount Pictures

If you weren’t pleased with the lack of blood and gore in Brad Pitt’s PG-13 rated zombie film “World War Z,” there’s good news.

Paramount is releasing an unrated version of the film.

The much-troubled film tossed out its  original 12-minute ending  for an  expensive reshoot of the final 40 minutes.

Despite that, the film ended up doing well at theaters earning $474 million worldwide.

It’s unclear whether the original ending — or more blood — will make an appearance in the special edition; however, a featurette called “Camouflage” about the film’s production and final scenes with Pitt make us hopeful.

Below are the features of the unrated version via Entertainment Weekly.

“World War Z” hits stores September 17.

Origins

The filmmakers discuss collaborating with renowned actor/producer Brad Pitt to create a zombie film the likes of which have never been seen.

Looking to Science

Explore the scientific realities of zombie behavior in nature and learn more about zombies in literature and film.

Outbreak

Go on set with Brad Pitt and director Marc Forster for a behind-the-scenes look at the film’s breathtaking first attack in Philadelphia.

The Journey Begins

Delve deeper into Gerry’s fight for survival during the dramatic escape in South Korea.

Behind the Wall

Explore the epic scene in Jerusalem and discover the incredible logistics of creating the elaborate stunts and crowd sequences.

Camouflage

Experience the final confrontation between Gerry and the zombies and discover the phenomenal scope of the film’s production.

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Dogs and Humans Evolved Together, Study Suggests


The gray wolf (Canis lupus lycaon), also known as the timber wolf, is the largest wild member of the dog family. Found in parts of North America

The gray wolf (Canis lupus lycaon), also known as the timber wolf, is the largest wild member of the dog family. Found in parts of North America

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Dogs are more than man’s best friend: They may be partners in humans’ evolutionary journey, according to a new study.

The study shows that dogs split from gray wolves about 32,000 years ago, and that since then, domestic dogs‘ brains and digestive organs have evolved in ways very similar to the brains and organs of humans.

The findings suggest a more ancient origin for dog domestication than previously suggested. They also hint that a common environment drove both dog and human evolution for thousands of years.

“As domestication is often associated with large increases in population density and crowded living conditions, these ‘unfavorable’ environments might be the selective pressure that drove the rewiring of both species,” the researchers wrote in their article, published today (May 14) in the journal Nature Communications.

First domestication

It isn’t clear precisely when wolves were tamed and transformed into man’s best friend, and the date has been hotly debated. An ancient, doglike skull uncovered in the Siberian Mountains suggested that the first dogs were domesticated around 33,000 years ago from gray wolves. But genetic analysis suggested dogs in China were domesticated only about 16,000 years ago.

In any case, most researchers agree that by about 10,000 years ago, dogs were firmly ensconced in human society. [10 Breeds: What Your Dog Says About You]

Some studies show that the wild dogs of South China may have been the first domesticated canines.

To understand this domestication, Guo-dong Wang, a genetics researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and his colleagues analyzed the DNA of four gray wolves, three indigenous Chinese dogs and a German shepherd, a Belgian Malinois and a Tibetan mastiff.

The DNA suggests that the gray wolves split off from the indigenous dogs about 32,000 years ago, the researchers said.

“Chinese indigenous dogs might represent the missing link in dog domestication,” the researchers write in the paper.

Since then, dogs’ evolution has been gradual, and there were no sharp decreases in the dog population over time, suggesting dogs gradually became domesticated, after many years of scavenging from humans.

Parallel evolution

The team then compared corresponding genes in dogs and humans. They found both species underwent similar changes in genes responsible for digestion and metabolism, such as genes that code for cholesterol transport. Those changes could be due to a dramatic change in the proportion of animal versus plant-based foods that occurred in both at around the same time, the researchers said.

The team also found co-evolution in several brain processes — for instance, in genes that affect the processing of the brain chemical serotonin. In humans, variations in these genes affect levels of aggression. (This shared genetic trajectory might explain why Fluffy can be helped by antidepressant drugs, the authors hypothesize.)