New Children’s Books series – The Diaries of Montague J. Milford


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The Diaries of Montague J. Milford can be summed up as Sherlock Holmes meets The X Files.

Set in the mid 1800’s the stories center around Montague J. Milford, a young scientist who travels around investigating accounts of the paranormal trying to disprove them only to discover the strange goings on are real. He is joined on his adventures by Lady Ann Pendelton, a young Victorian era English daughter of nobility who shares his insatiable curiosity and love of science.

Geared for young readers the material is a mixture of adventure story telling, accurate period scientific technology and fantasy. My goal is to create stories that entertain the young readers while at the same time offer a hero and heroine that use there wits and scientific knowledge to save the day. With a mixture of humor, bravery, and ingenuity Montague and Lady Ann face down phantoms, creatures and things that go bump in the night. Montague is a scientist who uses his expertise to try to debunk accounts of super natural goings on only to have his courage tested when faced with the existence of super natural beings. With clinical problem solving reminiscent of Sherlock Holmes he sets out on his quest for the truth. The character of Lady Ann also provides an excellent roll model for young girls through not only her bravery in peril but through her being the intellectual and technical equal of Montague.

Raising money for a Halloween launch!

It’s such an exciting feeling! We already have two books completed, The Shadow of Cavendor Manor and The Phantom of the Docks, and we are working on a third The Beast of Boston!. The goal is to have an ongoing series following Montague and Lady Ann on their adventures. But to do that we need to complete the third volume and get the word out!

The funds we are raising will not only go towards the cover design and editing costs of the third book but also to a promotional campaign for the series this Halloween. Graphic design and editing are quite expensive.  And promotional materials even more so with printing costs and ad placement. After all a project can only be successful if people know about it. So we have come to indiegogo to raise what we need.

We truly do believe in our concept and I love writing about these two wonderful characters. I know a lot of people say it but I think we honestly do have the next Harry Potter on our hands. The concept is completely original, the stories are fun and exciting, and the possibilities for adventure are endless.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT OUR INDIEGOGO CROWD SOURCING SITE AND HELP SUPPORT OUR BOOK!

OUR SPECIAL THANK YOU GIFTS!

I want to thank everyone who supports us in bringing our books to the public. You are as much a part of the team as we are. So the best way to show thanks is with credit in the books and even first edition copies to share and treasure. We appreciate all contributions large and small.

And if you think you may know someone who would like to help us as well please tweet a link to our indiegogo campaign or share it on your facebook

Parkour


“The object of parkour is to get from one place to another in the most efficient way possible using only the human body and the objects in the environment”(wikipedia).

7 runs by LeVietnamienVolant, in Marseille, Martigues, and Saint-Mitre (south of France).Recorded in May 2010.

A film by L’1consolable.
Tracer: Le Vietnamien Volant
Filming & editing: L’1consolable
Original soundtrack by Bonobo.

 

House built on a rock


Photo Credit:

 MARKO DJURICA/REUTERS

Balancing on a rock in the middle of the Drina River in Serbia, the tiny one-room home was built in 1968. Pounded by floods and high winds, it continues to stand strong against the elements of time. The structure, located near the town of Bajina Basta, has become a well-known attraction for visitors to the area.

2013-05-22T140638Z_594362116_GM1E95M1PAD01_RTRMADP_3_SERBIA

Dogs and Humans Evolved Together, Study Suggests


The gray wolf (Canis lupus lycaon), also known as the timber wolf, is the largest wild member of the dog family. Found in parts of North America

The gray wolf (Canis lupus lycaon), also known as the timber wolf, is the largest wild member of the dog family. Found in parts of North America

Originally posted by:

Dogs are more than man’s best friend: They may be partners in humans’ evolutionary journey, according to a new study.

The study shows that dogs split from gray wolves about 32,000 years ago, and that since then, domestic dogs‘ brains and digestive organs have evolved in ways very similar to the brains and organs of humans.

The findings suggest a more ancient origin for dog domestication than previously suggested. They also hint that a common environment drove both dog and human evolution for thousands of years.

“As domestication is often associated with large increases in population density and crowded living conditions, these ‘unfavorable’ environments might be the selective pressure that drove the rewiring of both species,” the researchers wrote in their article, published today (May 14) in the journal Nature Communications.

First domestication

It isn’t clear precisely when wolves were tamed and transformed into man’s best friend, and the date has been hotly debated. An ancient, doglike skull uncovered in the Siberian Mountains suggested that the first dogs were domesticated around 33,000 years ago from gray wolves. But genetic analysis suggested dogs in China were domesticated only about 16,000 years ago.

In any case, most researchers agree that by about 10,000 years ago, dogs were firmly ensconced in human society. [10 Breeds: What Your Dog Says About You]

Some studies show that the wild dogs of South China may have been the first domesticated canines.

To understand this domestication, Guo-dong Wang, a genetics researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and his colleagues analyzed the DNA of four gray wolves, three indigenous Chinese dogs and a German shepherd, a Belgian Malinois and a Tibetan mastiff.

The DNA suggests that the gray wolves split off from the indigenous dogs about 32,000 years ago, the researchers said.

“Chinese indigenous dogs might represent the missing link in dog domestication,” the researchers write in the paper.

Since then, dogs’ evolution has been gradual, and there were no sharp decreases in the dog population over time, suggesting dogs gradually became domesticated, after many years of scavenging from humans.

Parallel evolution

The team then compared corresponding genes in dogs and humans. They found both species underwent similar changes in genes responsible for digestion and metabolism, such as genes that code for cholesterol transport. Those changes could be due to a dramatic change in the proportion of animal versus plant-based foods that occurred in both at around the same time, the researchers said.

The team also found co-evolution in several brain processes — for instance, in genes that affect the processing of the brain chemical serotonin. In humans, variations in these genes affect levels of aggression. (This shared genetic trajectory might explain why Fluffy can be helped by antidepressant drugs, the authors hypothesize.)

Picasso at Work!


Pablo Picasso in 1962

Pablo Picasso in 1962

Pablo Ruiz y Picasso, known as Pablo Picasso ( 25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer who spent most of his adult life in France. As one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, he is widely known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture,[2][3] the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a portrayal of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War.

Picasso, Henri Matisse and Marcel Duchamp are commonly regarded as the three artists who most defined the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the 20th century, responsible for significant developments in painting, sculpture, printmaking and ceramics.